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How do you sit? It might effect you



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How do you sit?


  • Total voters
    16

AngelOfDestruction

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Give me rep then I'll tell *gets Rep* Haha!sucker!
Here is the whole thing from an article im not giving you the link because last time the link went away........My back hurts just reading it

New Advice: Don't Sit Up Straight

Sara Goudarzi
LiveScience Staff Writer
LiveScience.com Tue Nov 28, 5:15 PM ET

The longstanding advice to "sit up straight" has been turned on its head by a new study that suggests leaning back is a much better posture.
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Researchers analyzed different postures and concluded that the strain of sitting upright for long hours is a perpetrator of chronic back problems.

Using a new form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers studied 22 volunteers with no back pain history. The subjects assumed three different positions: slouching; sitting up straight at 90 degrees; and sitting back with a 135-degree posture—all while their spines were scanned.

"A 135-degree body-thigh sitting posture was demonstrated to be the best biomechanical sitting position, as opposed to a 90-degree posture, which most people consider normal," said study author, Waseem Amir Bashir, a researcher at the University of Alberta Hospital in Canada. "Sitting in a sound anatomic position is essential, since the strain put on the spine and its associated ligaments over time can lead to pain, deformity and chronic illness."

Back pain, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, is the most common cause of work-related disability in the United States. It costs Americans nearly $50 billion annually. Sitting appears to be a major cause of this ailment.

"We were not created to sit down for long hours, but somehow modern life requires the vast majority of the global population to work in a seated position," Bashir said. "This made our search for the optimal sitting position all the more important."here

When strain is placed on the spine, the spinal disks start to move and misalign. At a 90-degree sitting position, this movement was most prominent. The disks were least moved when subjects were sitting back at a 135-degree sitting position.

"We have to do something that is similar to the lying position," Bashir told LiveScience. Lying down in a relaxed position with your knees slightly bent is the best position that a person can be in, because it doesn't cause any stress on the ligaments, the thigh muscles as well as on the back.

Sitting on a chair that provides proper support, such as a slightly tilted back car seat, can mimic the relaxed supine position. Slouching caused a reduction in the spinal height which means that there was high rate of wear and tear in the lowest two spinal levels.

"This may be all that is necessary to prevent back pain, rather than trying to cure pain that has occurred over the long term due to bad postures," Bashir said.

The study was detailed today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
 

Abel

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I usually sit with the elbow of the arm not using hte mouse bent and on the desk supporting my chin. That's why I have cubital tunnel syndrome, and why I switched to use the mouse with my left hand, so that it affects my right hand instead and I can still rock out those riffs on guitar with my left.
 
Last edited:

Vayne Mechanics

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Depends on what I'm doing. Computer browsing and such? I move my arse forward to the edge of the seat and lean back. I love sleeping so that position is quite comfy. Sometimes I'll do the same, but put my legs on top of my desk if I'm watching something.

Working is a slouched position. I hardly ever sit in 90 degree angle.
 
C

cam ron 77

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I usually sit on the edge of my seat with my legs crossed and twisted to one side of my chair.Thats the most comfortable position for watching television .When i'm not watching television i'll just hunch over my keyboard. I never sit back in my chair. if i do i have to cock my head to one side because i have bad vision. its just easier to sit forward. when i sit back the screen is like two feet away from my eyes and its just too hard to even see what I'm typing right now when I do that.
 
T

TwilightExternal

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Sometimes I sit with my leg being horizontal and resting on my other leg. I lean back and bring in the chair closer when im thinking or something, and when i work im slouch forwards and rest my hand on my forehead [or something like that =P]
...
hmmmm ..
 

Keitaro Urashima

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Hmph, and my mom says sightinh up right is better. now that ive seen this, screw, im sitting at 135 degree angle forever screw you 90 degrees!!
 

CK the Fat

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Well most chairs don't even from a 90 degree perfectly vertical angle... from what I see in my house most hit around 115 anyway.
 

raedyn_l

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According to this poll, I'm the only person who sits up straight.

Technically, though, the spine doesn't support any weight when you're sitting upright at a ninety degree angle. Your butt does.

This mentions nothing about that particular body part, so I'm not phased in the least.

I'm still going to sit up straight. :)
 

CK the Fat

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"Technically, though, the spine doesn't support any weight when you're sitting upright at a ninety degree angle. Your butt does."

Technically your spine supports your ribs which supports your chest. Your upper spine bears smaller amounts of burden and your lower spine bears much more. Your bit is simply the contact between you and an outside force.
 
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