Do fictional games have a stronger sense of humanity than no fictional games?



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Like god of war, last of us, kingdom hearts series, and metal gear. I just noticed despite being in a environment that no real person will ever be in, the drive to make them more human and vulnerable make them bigger success than games in a real world setting of actual events. I wanted to start this conversation because it's intriguing to me. Thanks, and share your thoughts.
 

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I think audiences are more willing to get invested into a fantastical world and it's characters than an extremely realistic one. That said, games like Life is Strange and Heavy Rain do tend to get lots of attention as well.

We enjoy the dissonance of human characters in fantastic worlds, because we'd like to be there and we'd like to see how real people would act in magical situations.
 

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I guess the thing with non-fictional settings is that developers try to make the characters as realistic as possible which is not always the most charming solution. I mean, pricks in Video Games often come across as funny, usually have a lot of sarcasm, are sassy, well-dressed and in general, are cool while realistic pricks are usually ... pricks, with very little to laugh at. Character tropes that work well in video games would probably be totally annoying in real life (I imagine someone who is always overly cheerful, playful and friendship-py like Sora would be nice in some instances, but also overbearing in real life) while a real life character with all his internal conflicts, problems and ugly moments that we humans are sometimes just having could be hard to accept in a video game. Making someone look human and vulnerable is much more desirable in a video game than it is in real life where society even looks down and picks on those who make themselves vulnerable while pretending everyone should be able to show emotions because being human in a video game usually comes down to the better aspects of humanity (like having a backstory you can empathize with, admitting faults, trying to open up and get rejected but get accepted in the end) while "real" humanity has a lot more aspects one can't really program like having sudden emotional outbursts, being offended by an ill-placed word or experiencing awkward social interactions.
That said, you can't generalize this, there are probably a ton of lovable non-fictional characters, but writing can be quite different for the two types.
 
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