• Hello everybody! We have tons of new awards for the new year that can be requested through our Awards System thanks to Antifa Lockhart! Some are limited-time awards so go claim them before they are gone forever...

    CLICK HERE FOR AWARDS

God's Not Dead



REGISTER TO REMOVE ADS
Status
Not open for further replies.

Dreaded_Desire62

bronze member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,448
Awards
2
Age
29
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Website
gmail.com
God's Not Dead Official Trailer - YouTube This is just a trailer to a movie coming out in Spring of 2014. The plot centers around a Fundamentalist Christian outwitting his Atheist teacher when it comes to the existence of God.

The teacher of course is out to show the student who the true fool is, because he can't believe in the Christian God (in this sense) after the death of his mother to cancer. The student just wants to get the students to think for themselves.


But, of course, a few questions come to mind when this movie comes out. It'll probably be a failure at the box office.

Alright, anyways, let's pretend we're all classmates of this student.

What would guys think?

1. Would you necessarily believe him about Jesus and Yahweh or not?
2. Would you side with the teacher?
3. Do you think that both of them seem a bit hostile in their pursuits? If so, who is more judgmental?

What are you guys beliefs? Will they challenge them?
 

Nyangoro

Break the Spell
Joined
May 18, 2007
Messages
12,503
Awards
5
Age
31
Location
Somewhere 2D
Looks like a low budget melodrama with some serious overacting.

As far as its subject matter, I would be surprised if they even did justice to the side they're in favor of.
 

Dreaded_Desire62

bronze member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,448
Awards
2
Age
29
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Website
gmail.com
Looks like a low budget melodrama with some serious overacting.

As far as its subject matter, I would be surprised if they even did justice to the side they're in favor of.
Yeah, that's true. The acting is overrated and both sides seem to be flawed. A little skepticism is healthy or something like that.
 

Zettaflare

Commander
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
11,715
Awards
4
Location
California
Just finished watching the trailer. Seems like a christian propaganda film. Definitely will be skipping this
 

Reagan Rayden

Exploding Man
Joined
Dec 29, 2005
Messages
7,085
Awards
6
It actually looks like a fairly ok movie. There's just barely anything said to get people talking about religious philosophy in this thread.
 

Nyangoro

Break the Spell
Joined
May 18, 2007
Messages
12,503
Awards
5
Age
31
Location
Somewhere 2D
Honestly, the biggest indicator of this movie's probably quality is in a single line.

"Why do you hate God?"

When you put the argument's single biggest straw man in the trailer, it doesn't give me much confidence.
 

Dreaded_Desire62

bronze member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,448
Awards
2
Age
29
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Website
gmail.com
Honestly, the biggest indicator of this movie's probably quality is in a single line.

"Why do you hate God?"

When you put the argument's single biggest straw man in the trailer, it doesn't give me much confidence.
Agreed, and it doesn't help that theists have misconceptions about Atheists. There is a difference between disbelief and hate.
 

Pinwheel

The Origin
Joined
Sep 11, 2008
Messages
6,687
Awards
8
Honestly, the biggest indicator of this movie's probably quality is in a single line.

"Why do you hate God?"

When you put the argument's single biggest straw man in the trailer, it doesn't give me much confidence.
You basically said what I came here to say. This film feels largely one-sided and that line alone pretty much gives away how slanted it's probably going to be.
 

Lea

New member
Joined
Jun 15, 2013
Messages
242
Awards
3
Age
25
Location
USA
Website
joshtominus.com
Although I myself am a Christian, this doesn't even look slightly entertaining, and if anything will make Christian's look worse than we already look. The "testing your belief" concept could be interesting, but the writing and scenario of this does not look like it will be anywhere near satisfactory.
 

Dreaded_Desire62

bronze member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,448
Awards
2
Age
29
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Website
gmail.com
Although I myself am a Christian, this doesn't even look slightly entertaining, and if anything will make Christian's look worse than we already look. The "testing your belief" concept could be interesting, but the writing and scenario of this does not look like it will be anywhere near satisfactory.

Yep, but it is also reinforces old stereotypes about atheists. Not every atheist like the professor, the Asian guy played by Dean Cain (I think I got his name right, but he played as Superman) and that one lady talking to the band go around harassing people trying to get them to disbelieve. I've met some atheists that are pretty outgoing people and a lot of theists, mainly Christians that just seem to be mad at the world. Plus, couldn't the Asian guy played by Dean Cain and the atheist professor get into trouble for harassing people?
 

Pinwheel

The Origin
Joined
Sep 11, 2008
Messages
6,687
Awards
8
Yep, but it is also reinforces old stereotypes about atheists. Not every atheist like the professor, the Asian guy played by Dean Cain (I think I got his name right, but he played as Superman) and that one lady talking to the band go around harassing people trying to get them to disbelieve. I've met some atheists that are pretty outgoing people and a lot of theists, mainly Christians that just seem to be mad at the world. Plus, couldn't the Asian guy played by Dean Cain and the atheist professor get into trouble for harassing people?
That's what really irked me the most about that trailer. They pretty much make the guy out to be the stereotypical, edgy atheist who basically tries to force people "BELIEVE WHAT I BELIEVE." Then you have the other half with the nice young Christian boy. It's like taking some of the best for their view and some of the worst for the other.

That and a billion other things in this trailer. My god. It's so cringe-worthy.
 

Dreaded_Desire62

bronze member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,448
Awards
2
Age
29
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Website
gmail.com
That's what really irked me the most about that trailer. They pretty much make the guy out to be the stereotypical, edgy atheist who basically tries to force people "BELIEVE WHAT I BELIEVE." Then you have the other half with the nice young Christian boy. It's like taking some of the best for their view and some of the worst for the other.

That and a billion other things in this trailer. My god. It's so cringe-worthy.
Yeah, and this movie will probably be on top of the box office just like the Passion of the Christ was. They are going to continue that all atheists are a bunch of whiny crybabies that have no right to be mad at God. The Christian was just as pushy as the teacher is. Also, the saying of 'God can't help those that can't help themselves' is just asinine in the fact that it degrades people like the homeless, the handicapped and children. And, when somebody does get help, God gets the credit rather than the actual person.
 

Reagan Rayden

Exploding Man
Joined
Dec 29, 2005
Messages
7,085
Awards
6
Yeah, and this movie will probably be on top of the box office just like the Passion of the Christ was.

The production value of that movie kind of outplays what this movie is. I mean there were millions of people who were interested in what that movie had to offer. This is just another modern-day Christian flick.
 

Nutari

The Scotsman
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
2,855
Awards
3
Location
Milwaukee
I'm seeing the trailer much differently than you guys. Maybe it's because I'm at a Christian college, Trinity International University in Deerfield, IL. But from a philosophical standpoint, this movie interests me. I have heard many stories about professors like this- whereas I have a believing philosophy professor who is managing to find a way to teach us how to think for ourselves about our faith. It's actually really cool because we can still talk about and discuss, explain, evaluate, defend, and argue against the armada of philosophical beliefs from history. My professor doesn't stand up in front of the class and tell us "this philosophical view is insignificant," or "this view is ridiculous, believe this instead". He teaches it to us straight.

So for the sake of conversation, what have been your high school/college (preferably college) philosophy experiences? Have your professors been like this? Is this movie overdoing it with the overzealous atheist. I assume yes, but I would contend on the other hand, though, that there are plenty of angry atheists out there who do act like this, just as there is a plethora of Christians who are out to make the world burn. Something I have learned is that as I Christian, I am responsible for the Radical Extremist who goes out damning everybody to hell. To a degree it's "my" (as in a more collective sense, think the Church as a whole) fault that "I" haven't shown them that they are wrong in ways, and that they aren't showing God to be loving, but vengeful and full of hate. So, I see a lot of people here saying, not all atheists are like that, but I think it will help further discussion by not distancing yourselves from the radicals who shove "God is dead," down people's throats, but taking responsibility for them. Granted, atheism is more philosophy than theology, and so it's more difficult to say that atheists are collectively similar, as Christians all fall under one faith.

So, yeah.
 

Nutari

The Scotsman
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
2,855
Awards
3
Location
Milwaukee
1. Would you necessarily believe him about Jesus and Yahweh or not?
2. Would you side with the teacher?
3. Do you think that both of them seem a bit hostile in their pursuits? If so, who is more judgmental?

What are you guys beliefs? Will they challenge them?

Excuse my double post, but I want to answer these questions:

I would believe him (given I am a Christian). Depending on his theology and philosophy about the faith, his standing would be the deciding factor for me. If he has shaky and unbiblical theology, I would have to show him in scriptures how he is wrong, and help build him up, so that he could be credible in his argument.

If I were helping him to create an argument, I would side with the teacher, and play devil's advocate. But in the actual debate, not a chance. Maybe if I hadn't really discovered my faith, I would side with him, as there have been many moments where God has been silent until I've made the effort to listen.

The professor seems hostile from the get go, and it does appear that the kid gets hostile too, but wouldn't you get hostile if some guy was bludgeoning you with one sided philosophy? (That statement pertains to both sides) On the flip side, I think that the kid's getting hostile means he is serious about his faith. Anyway, I feel that the kid has the right to stand up for his philosophy, as long as he argues it in an academic and professional way. But since it is a movie... well...
 

Hidden

A boy named Crow
Joined
May 4, 2005
Messages
1,615
Awards
6
Age
33
Location
A world that never was
Website
www.freewebs.com
This is an interesting response, and it opens up the thread to the possibility of actual discussion.

So for the sake of conversation, what have been your high school/college (preferably college) philosophy experiences? Have your professors been like this? Is this movie overdoing it with the overzealous atheist.
I have had very little personal experience with the conflict of religion and secularism in college. However, in my senior year I joined a workshop at my college called "Reconceiving the Secular Liberal Arts," where a large percentage of students in attendance did express some experience of it. I don't think any of them had a professor as single-mindedly against their religious beliefs as the antagonist in this movie, but the larger point was that secularism was "assumed" in the classroom or religious beliefs were otherwise ignored or considered impermissible. And even conceding that in some classroom settings this is inevitable (a Geology class will not consider Young Earth Creationism in its syllabus), the general consensus was that this left a lot of "Big Questions" unasked and off-limits. The argument is that, given the formative nature of religious beliefs, it seems a strange omission to not consider these beliefs in larger contexts, in classes outside of the narrowly-guarded venues of Religious Studies.

Aldrain said:
Something I have learned is that as I Christian, I am responsible for the Radical Extremist who goes out damning everybody to hell. To a degree it's "my" (as in a more collective sense, think the Church as a whole) fault that "I" haven't shown them that they are wrong in ways, and that they aren't showing God to be loving, but vengeful and full of hate. So, I see a lot of people here saying, not all atheists are like that, but I think it will help further discussion by not distancing yourselves from the radicals who shove "God is dead," down people's throats, but taking responsibility for them.
I've struggled with this question as well, and while I wouldn't go so far as to say that I am "responsible" for the radicals/extremists who have different interpretations of my same basic beliefs, I do think we need to take better account of them. Because the people holding those 'extreme' views are still participating in the same larger structures of beliefs as you or I. To take your example, Christians who preach that God is loving and those who preach that God is vengeful are using the same Bible; how then do they reach such incompatible readings? Does the religion/philosophy in fact allow for both interpretations, in which case how did we arrive at our own?

More thought needs to be given to the multiple interpretations that are possible within a given belief system. It isn't enough to say "Not all _________ are like that;" where does the difference come from?

Aldrain said:
Granted, atheism is more philosophy than theology, and so it's more difficult to say that atheists are collectively similar, as Christians all fall under one faith.
This is a standard argument, but I'm not so certain it is true.
 
Last edited:

Dreaded_Desire62

bronze member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,448
Awards
2
Age
29
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Website
gmail.com
This is an interesting response, and it opens up the thread to the possibility of actual discussion.


I have had very little personal experience with the conflict of religion and secularism in college. However, in my senior year I joined a workshop at my college called "Reconceiving the Secular Liberal Arts," where a large percentage of students in attendance did express some experience of it. I don't think any of them had a professor as single-mindedly against their religious beliefs as the antagonist in this movie, but the larger point was that secularism was "assumed" in the classroom or religious beliefs were otherwise ignored or considered impermissible. And even conceding that in some classroom settings this is inevitable (a Geology class will not consider Young Earth Creationism in its syllabus), the general consensus was that this left a lot of "Big Questions" unasked and off-limits. The argument is that, given the formative nature of religious beliefs, it seems a strange omission to not consider these beliefs in larger contexts, in classes outside of the narrowly-guarded venues of Religious Studies.


I've struggled with this question as well, and while I wouldn't go so far as to say that I am "responsible" for the radicals/extremists who have different interpretations of my same basic beliefs, I do think we need to take better account of them. Because the people holding those 'extreme' views are still participating in the same larger structure of beliefs as you or I. To take your example, Christians who preach that God is loving and those who preach that God is vengeful are using the same Bible; how then do they reach such incompatible readings? Does the religion/philosophy in fact allow for both interpretations, in which case how did we arrive at our own?

More thought needs to be given to the multiple interpretations that are possible within a given belief system. It isn't enough to say "Not all _________ are like that;" where does the difference come from?


This is a standard argument, but I'm not so certain it is true.

Good points. I've heard a story recently about a pastor that got beaten up by some girl's 'militant' atheist (militant in the regard as that is what he labels himself). They were in church and the pastor asked the girl if she was getting abused by her boyfriend right in front of him. He got really badly hurt and I think the guy went to jail for nearly killing the pastor.

I can say at least the pastor intervened unlike one other story I heard from a podcast about a woman and her daughter that were stuck in the bathroom for three days without food due the wife getting the husband angry or whatever. They survived by getting by with water from the bathroom faucet. They told their story to their pastor and he agreed with the husband. So, there are two or more ways of looking at religion.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top