Lit ► Crime and Punishment



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Pelafina

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Crime and Punishment is a novel by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky that was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments in 1866. It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoevsky's full-length novels after he returned from his exile in Siberia, and the first great novel of his mature period.

Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, an impoverished St. Petersburg ex-student who formulates and executes a plan to kill a hated, unscrupulous pawnbroker for her money, thereby solving his financial problems and at the same time, he argues, ridding the world of an evil, worthless parasite. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by relating himself to Napoleon, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose.

I am in the middle of this novel right now, and it is honestly one of the most excellent things I've ever read. The characterization is excellent, the language is simple enough, but effective, philosophies and ideas are expressed subtlety but well, etc. I'll try not to praise it overly in here.

Anyone that's read this should contribute to this thread. I'd be really interested in discussing some of the themes or ideas.
Also, please use spoiler tags, I would appreciate not having anything ruined.

Let's do this.
 

Solar

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I heard of this book when I was quite young and really wanted to read it but never got the chance

picking up as soon as possible
 

Enchanted Rose

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This is an incredible novel; I found it so deeply gripping and intellectually stimulating.

And yet, when I think about it, most of the plot revolved around Raskolnikov feverishly rising from his couch, walking through the Haymarket in a bedraggled and paranoia state, getting confused and falling asleep on the side of a road, waking up and having a ‘fml’ moment, renewing his purpose and visiting the scene of the crime - drawing attention to himself and making himself look suspicious, giving his last ruble to a random prostitute and/or beggar, getting drunk and injured, shouting at passers-by, collapsing in the Haymarket…
repeat for 900 pages.

I developed an unconventional crush on Raskolnikov. I think it was the hat and long coat combo that did it for me (in the edition that I had, there was a portrait of him on the cover and he looked hot), combined with his intellectual arrogance and random acts of kindness.

There are loads of things to discuss, such as …

The cat and mouse games between Porfiry and Raskolnikov
Nietzsche’s superman theory/ Raskolnikov’s Napoleon theory
Svidrigailov
The Epilogue
 

Pelafina

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This is an incredible novel; I found it so deeply gripping and intellectually stimulating.
I am really glad you're around, this is sure to be a good discussion. (when I finish, of course, which should be within a week. I'm trying to read it closely, otherwise I'd be finished sooner.)

Right now I'm in the middle of part four, just after Svidrigailov and Raskolnikov have their conversation, and Raskolnikov and Luzhin have their duel over Dunya. This is a really neat part.

Additionally, I have no idea how people in my class find this book boring. Even if nothing much is happening, it's one of the most gripping things I have read in ages.
 
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